Review: Fables Vol. 20: Camelot by Bill Willingham, Mark Buckingham, Steve Leialoha, Russ Braun, Daniel Dos Santos, Barry Kitson, Andrew Pepoy, and Gary Erskine

fcTitle: Fables Vol. 20: Camelot

Author: Bill Willingham, Mark Buckingham, Steve Leialoha, Russ Braun, Daniel Dos Santos, Barry Kitson, Andrew Pepoy, and Gary Erskine

Publisher: Vertigo

Source: Borrowed from brother

Check this book out on Goodreads.

Buy this book at: Chapters | Book Depository

4 stars

Rose Red takes the mantle of Paladin of Hope to rally the Fables in the tragic aftermath of “Snow White.” A new dark age calls for a new Round Table, with modern knights willing to take on a sacred quest to reassemble the shattered pieces of Fabletown. (Source: Goodreads)

In this, the 20th, volume of Fables we see movement towards the end. The beginning stages of wrap-up. Rose Red begins assembly the knights of the new round table, in her new Camelot. Ozma and Morgan Le Fey continue their work to try and reassemble Bigby. Winter continues working as the North Wind. There are a few other storylines but those are the main ones. There’s also a short, non-Camelot related, comic at the end which shows how Fabletown will eventually end.

I really enjoyed this one. I found it much better than the last volume, which was both depressing (with lots of deaths) and just overall boring. This volume had lots of movement and felt less like filler before the end comes. The art was great, as always. The character development was interesting with the reassigning of Camelot’s famous roles. I think knowing that the end is coming soon is adding some bitterness to the whole experience overall though, and is making me cautious about the story because what is things don’t turn out how I want them to?

I really enjoyed the Camelot plotline. I found it sort of unexpected, aside from knowing the title of the volume I didn’t know how it would fit in. I think I should have seen it coming, with the introduction of Morgan Le Fey and the Lady of the Lake all that time ago, but I think I just overlooked those things. I liked the idea of Rose Red working to redeem other people, it definite fits into her story arc ever since Boy Blue died. I also think that Snow White’s development is interesting, and works well given the recent tragedies in her family. I liked the sort of “afterlife” section with Bigby, we see the reintroduction of some beloved characters, which came with some sort of heavy handed direct address (at least it felt that way to me). I am definitely excited, if a little sad, to see how things will tie up as we get closer and closer to the end.

As I’ve mentioned the character development was pretty great. I think Rose Red and Snow White’s character development was great. It fit into the story and the mood of their characters in the last few volumes. I was also glad to see the return of some of the more neglected characters. I’m also glad to see the children getting more into their roles, especially with movement on the prophecy happening. Overall the characters worked well and fit well into the story so far.

The art, as always, was fantastic. The covers in Fables are always some of the best artwork around. When I first started reading this and James Jean was doing the covers I was just amazed by him. He doesn’t do the cover art anymore, but their are definitely some other amazing artists working on the covers now. The overall Camelot cover being one of my favourite things in this volume, Rose Red looks amazing.

I cannot recommend this series highly enough. It’s a great twist on classic stories. It combines action, drama, romance, and comedy so well that even the most anti-romcom person I know still loves this story and never gets sick of the gooey romance. This volume certainly did not let me down!

Ramble on,
Kimber


Have you read Fables Vol. 20: CamelotLet me know your thoughts in the comments!
Check out Bill Willingham at his Goodreads, Twitter, and website.
Connect with me on Goodreads, BlogLovin, and Twitter.

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